Archive for desserts

Vanilla Souffle Cake

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Last Sunday after a delicious grilled steak dinner, someone at the table said, “A lemon souffle would be great right now.”  I briefly considered whipping one up, but immediately thought better of it and broke out some chocolate bars and ice cream.  But the lemon souffle stuck in my head, and by Monday evening, I had to have one.  After picking up various kids from various places, I got home, put dinner in front of them and set to work.

As I assembled the ingredients I came to a disturbing realization:  the lemons in my fruit bowl were long past their prime and their rind was in no shape to provide the fresh citrus-y zest needed for this dessert.  So I moved to plan B:  Vanilla souffle.

I had made this lemon souffle cake many times before–it’s pretty simple, aside from the water bath cooking requirement, which is a bit of a pain.    It serves 6 sensibly or 4 gluttonously, and is delightful with berries.  I figured it would easily translate into vanilla, and I was right. I followed the recipe to a T, with the following substitution:  omit lemon zest and juice; instead scrape the insides of 1 1/2 vanilla beans into a bowl, and add 2 tsp vanilla extract.  The verdict:  delicious.  It was not as refreshing as the lemon, lacking that citrus lightness, but had a delightfully rich vanilla custard feel, which fit the bill on a rainy summer evening.

Following the recipe in the above link, here’s a pictorial step by step:

Vanilla beans w/ egg, milk, flour, sugar….

souffleingredients

 

Whip egg whites til stiff:

whippingeggwhitesBake in water bath:

lemonsoufflebaking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Strawberries with Aged Balsamic and Ice Cream

strawberrybalsamicNormally, I’m a chocolate, caramel, cream, buttery cakey, ooey-gooey, dessert kind of girl.  But when I happened upon a quart of  beautiful, just picked strawberries in the Headhouse Farmers’ Market, they spoke to me.  I knew i needed to do something that really showcased the fruit and didn’t interfere too much with its texture, flavor or freshness.

As I rummaged through the cabinet seeking inspiration, I spotted a small bottle of aged balsamic vinegar, which had been part of a delightful gourmet gift basket I received awhile back.  An idea began to germinate–vanilla ice cream topped with sliced strawberries and balsamic vinegar.   Do note, aged balsamic is a sweet, thicker, almost syrupy concoction which works with desserts as well as some salads, particularly those that feature fruits and nuts tossed with the greens.  This oh-so-simple dessert was a showstopper; it highlighted the fruit, offered a unique and complementary flavor with the vinegar, and a bed of ice cream is the ideal summer treat.  Did I mention it took all of 45 seconds to prepare a serving?  And no oven required.

Here’s how to make heaven for one:

A scoop or two of best quality vanilla ice cream

1/2 cup sliced fresh strawberries

1 tsp (or more) 18 year old balsamic vinegar, drizzled over top.

Enjoy.

This would be wonderful raspberries, or with peaches as they begin to appear in markets.

If you can’t get your hands on aged balsamic (it can be hard to find and rather pricey–best to procure it the way I did as a gift!) then you can cheat and reduce regular balsamic.  For four servings, dump a cup of regular balsamic in a saucepan and boil til it’s thick and syrupy.    This may take about 20 minutes. Drizzle as above.

Billionaire’s Shortbread

billionairesshortbread

I found this recipe in last month’s Food and Wine, and in a few short weeks it has become part of my regular repertoire.    Once I saw the combo of caramel, dark chocolate and salt, I knew I was a gonner.

The recipe is, quite literally, an upgrade on the British confection “Millionaire’s Shortbread”, which comprises a layer of buttery cookie crust, filled with condensed milk and topped with  milk chocolate.  By using homemade caramel and dark chocolate ganache, and adding some cornmeal to the shortbread layer this version is much richer, hence the name.

Sure, it involves more steps than the average bar cookie, and use of a candy thermometer.  Admittedly, I strenuously object to undue fuss in the kitchen.  But I promise, when you try these, you’ll agree they are worth the extra effort and steps.

candythermometer

I have so far made them for:  book group; a dinner party; my pediatrician’s office as a thank you for “finding” my sick daughter an appointment  on a very busy Monday; and for myself as a palliative after a very stressful week.

Give them a try–you’ll be glad you did.  Or maybe not, as they are addictive.

Banana Cream Pie

bananacreampie

My version did not look this pretty. But it was delicious anyway.

My son requested banana cream pie this past weekend.  As one who will do almost anything to make her teenage children be nice to her, I gamely assembled the ingredients.  If you have teenagers, you will understand this immediately, and if you don’t, then suspend your judgement.  When your adorable little ones enter these tumultuous years, you’ll see what I mean.

But back to the pie.  It is a very simple preparation, and if you are inclined toward shortcuts, you can ‘cheat’ on the crust by purchasing a prepared graham cracker shell.  You can also cheat on the pudding and buy a mix, but that seriously downgrades the result; the vanilla pudding is rapturous and really makes the pie.

Let me state for the record that my pie tasted great, but the visual wasn’t all it could have been. Knowing that it was just a dessert for the family, and it was a busy Sunday which involved shuttling various members of the family to sundry activities in distant locales, I didn’t fuss with making it look pretty.  But it didn’t matter.  It was a hit. And for a brief moment, it accomplished the intended goal.  My son actually said to me:  ”Mom, thanks for making me banana cream pie.  It was good.”  Success!

bananacreampieingreds

Here’s what I did:

1.  Make graham cracker crust according to this recipe.  Cool completely.

grahamcrackercrust

2.  Make philly food lovers vanilla pudding.  Cool Completely.

3.  Slice 3 ripe bananas and sprinkle them into the pie crust.  Spoon pudding over bananas and spread to cover.  (There will probably be about 1 cup leftover; save it for breakfast!)

4.  Chill until ready to serve, and garnish with fresh whipped cream.

So, like I said, mine wasn’t pretty, but it was a hit.

 

bananapiecut

Red Devil’s Food Cake

reddevilcakeThis recipe was given to me as a gift from a grateful neighbor.  I delivered homemade chicken broth to her when she was recuperating from a tonsillectomy, and this gem was included in her thank you note.  Red Devil’s Food Cake was an old faithful in her family from their days in rural Maryland. Back then, they had a neighbor named Etha King who was famed for her baking skills. Miss Etha used to bring this cake to every church picnic, backyard barbecue, birth, death, and every event in between, and my friend managed to get her hands on the recipe.

I gave it a shot for my son’s birthday, and it was a crowd pleaser!

Ms. Etha’s Red Devil’s Food Cake

1 stick butter

2 cups sugar

2 eggs

3 cups flour

1/2 tsp salt

1 cup sour cream

4 tablespoons cocoa

1/2 cup boiling water

1 tsp vanilla

2 tsp baking soda

1.  Heat oven to 350 and spray an oblong pan or 2 round pans.

2.  Cream butter, then add sugar; cream together.

3.  Beat in eggs, one at  a time.

4.  Sift flour and salt; add to mixture, then add sour cream and mix well.

5.  Dissolve cocoa in boiling water, add to batter, along with vanilla and baking soda.

6.  Pour batter into prepared pan and bake 30-35 minutes til done.  Cool and frost as desired.

 

I frosted this with chocolate cream cheese icing and it was a huge hit.

 

How to Make Apple Cobbler

applecobblerserved

Tasked with bringing dessert to a frontier-themed book group meeting, I gravitated toward seasonal, homey comfort food.  We read “Oh, Pioneers” by Willa Cather, so traditional American seemed the route to take.

There was a mention of Apple Dumplings in the book, but that involved rolling dough for individual turnovers, and I strenuously avoid that.  Plus, making separate apple dumplings for everyone in our group of 10 seemed daunting.  But apple cobbler  accomplished the same mission with far less fuss. Cobbler gets its name from the crust’s top.  When it bakes it creates a bumpy, or cobbled texture.  Now, full disclosure, desserts of this ilk seem–to me–overly evocative of breakfast, so I have to sugar them up.  Vanilla ice cream, whipped cream, and/or caramel sauce does the trick.

Here’s what I did:

1.  Peel and slice 6-8 apples.

2.  Toss them in an oblong baking dish with juice of 1/2 a lemon, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 tsp cinnamon.applecobblerprep1

3.  In bowl, mix 2 cups flour, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1/3 cup Crisco, and 3 tablespoons butter cut in pieces.  Use electric mixer, pastry cutter or two knives to mix; it should look like coarse crumbs.applecobblerdough

4.  Add 1 egg and 1/3 cup buttermilk or regular milk to flour mixture.  Mix gently, and knead a few times to blend.

applecobblerprebake

5.  Take small handfuls of the dough and place it on top of apples in pan, pressing slightly to cover.  Sprinkle 2 tablespoons sugar over top of dough, and bake 40 mins at 375, or until crust is brown and apples are softened.

applecobblercooked

6.  Serve warm with whipped cream, vanilla ice cream, or caramel sauce.

 

Apple Pound Cake

appleinorchard

Every autumn we take a trip to the apple orchard.  It’s a lovely outing, and we always top it off with  lunch at Victory Brewpub, so there’s something in it for everyone.  We pick a lot of apples.  I am not conversant in bushels and pecks, or how many make up a boatload, but we come home with far more apples than we can possibly consume.  Of course, we share them with friends and neighbors, and I concoct a variety of recipes that include apples.   A recent success was a this Apple Pound Cake.  (Trust me, looks aren’t everything.)crackedapplecake

I got the recipe years ago from a secretary at my husband’s firm–it was TYPED on an index card, so that shows you its age.  recipe

 

But it stood the test of time.  Two errors on my part:

1.  I didn’t allow the cake to cool sufficiently, so when I dumped it from the Bundt pan, it cracked.

2.  When I put the layer of apples into the batter, I didn’t mix them in properly.  They kind of created a barrier between the top and bottom of the cake, so it didn’t completely hold together–also contributing to the crack.

Despite their derisive comments, however, my family gobbled it up.

Here’s the recipe, courtesy of Helen, who has long since left the ranks of the secretarial pool and risen to a leadership position in IT.  And she’s still a brilliant baker.

Apple Pound Cake

3 cups flour

2 1/2 cups sugar

2 sticks butter

1 stick margarine (I omitted margarine and used 3 sticks butter in my version)

6 eggs

1 cup milk

2 tsp vanilla

1/4 tsp salt

3 tsp baking powder

3 apples, peeled, cored, and chopped

Grease and flour a Bundt Pan, set aside.  Mix all ingredients except apples in large bowl.  Beat on medium for 10 minutes until totally blended and increased in volume–it gets a bit fluffy.  Pour half the batter in the pan, top with apples, and press them into to batter.  Top with remaining batter, and tamp down lightly to be sure apples are integrated (this will avoid the unsightly crack you see in my cake, above.)

Put cake in COLD oven and turn to 350.  Bake 1 1/2 hours until toothpick comes out clean.  Cool, and remove from pan.

 

Coconut Ginger Blondies

coconutgingerblondies

Our book group met last night and I was asked to bring dessert.   Being foodie bookworms, we usually try to match the menu with the book in some way.  This time it was easy; we had read Heat and Dust, which takes place in India, so the food and venue were an obvious choice.  Member Farah, reknown Indian cook and hostess was drafted, willingly, as is her custom, to handle the appetizers and main, and I was tasked with dessert.

farahsari

I know a billion people can’t be wrong, but I can’t agree with the Subcontinent on dessert.  I find the textures and flavors don’t meet my western palate when it comes to sweets.     But I was determined to come up with something that complemented Farah’s traditional Indian menu while tickling the tastebuds of the group.    I started to think about Indian flavors, and arrived at ginger.  I considered the ginger blondies that we had featured some years back, but I wanted even more of an Indian flavor in the dessert.  These coconut ginger blondies fit the bill; they integrated Indian ingredients and flavors  (coconut, ginger, cashews) while sticking firmly to a western preparation, sweetness level, and texture.  Here’s what I did:

Coconut Ginger Blondies

Grease a square 8×8 inch pan and heat oven to 350.

1 stick butter, melted

1 cup brown sugar

1 egg

2 Tbsp dark rum (optional)

2 tsp grated fresh ginger

1 tsp vanilla

1 cup flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1 tsp powdered ginger

3/4 cup sweetened flaked coconut

1/4 cup chopped candied ginger

1/2 cup chopped cashews (optional)

1.  Mix first 6 ingredients in medium bowl.  Add flour, baking powder, salt and powdered ginger in a heap on top of this mixture.  Give them a few brief strokes to integrate the dry ingredients before blending with the wet mixture.   (alternatively, mix the dries in  a smaller bowl, then add to main mixture—but I hate to dirty another thing!)

2.  Add coconut, candied ginger and cashews.  Blend thoroughly.

3.  Bake 25 minutes until edges are beginning to brown and center is completely set.  Cool and cut into squares.

Note:  my husband gave these raves with one comment:  he thought the cashews were overkill and made the bars a tad too rich.  Everyone else thought they were splendid.

 

Peach Trifle

Screen shot 2013-09-03 at 1.00.42 PM

Coming to the end of Peach Season, I’m determined to enjoy these glorious orbs in every form.  Some recent highlights:

  • Tossed them in salad with Arugula and goat cheese,
  • Chopped them into salsas,
  • Caramelized them and dumped them on pound cake,
  • Baked them into tarts, muffins, scones,
  • Chopped and topped them with whipped cream.

But one of the most dramatic uses so far was this glorious Peach Trifle, which I brought to a party last week. It was a hit.

If you don’t mind getting your hands dirty, I discovered a quick and easy way to deal with the peaches that doesn’t involve peeling, scalding, or chopping–see below.  It greatly reduces the time and effort this operation requires, but it is messy.

 

peachtrifleprep

Here’s the recipe, which generously served 12 with leftovers.

3 packages lady fingers (the sponge cake type, not the crunchy ones)
8-9 ripe peaches (save one for garnish)
double batch of chilled Philly Food Lovers Vanilla Pudding,

1 pint heavy whipping cream

1/4 cup sugar

1 tsp vanilla

Cuantro or Gran Marnier

1. Line the bottom of a large, glass bowl with lady fingers. Splash them with Cuantro (about 1 tablespoon).

2. Cut each peach in half and remove pit. Grab cut peach halves and squeeze them into the bowl. (If this is too hands on, feel free to peel and chop peaches the traditional way.) When there is a generous layer of peach mush on the lady fingers, spread with a layer of vanilla pudding.

3. Repeat this process, layering lady fingers, a sprinkle of Cuantro, squished peaches, and vanilla pudding until the bowl is nearly full. Then whip the cream with the sugar and vanilla and spread it over the top.

4. Slice the last peach into thin, even wedges and arrange decoratively over the cream. You can also top with fresh berries or sliced almonds for additional garnish if desired.

5. Chill at least 1 hour before serving.

S’mores Without the Campfire

smoresdone

My daughter was craving sweets the other day while studying for her final exams.  Somehow, s’mores crept into her head between algebra formulas and French verbs, and she and her brother decided to cook up a simple version of s’mores.  Pretty resourceful, I have to admit, and the result was quite tasty.  Here’s what they did:

1.  Heat oven to 350.

2.  On a parchment-lined, rimmed cookie sheet, lay a few graham crackers.

3.  Generously sprinkle them with mini marshmallows and chocolate chips.

smoresmarshm

smoresprep

4.  Bake 10 minutes until chocolate begins to melt and marshmallow begin to brown.

5.  Remove from oven, cool slightly, and enjoy.

These are a fabulous treat for summer.  Not only do s’mores evoke real or imagined recollections of summer camp, but this version only requires a brief stint in the oven, so won’t overheat your kitchen during the dog days.

Not sure about the results of the French exam yet, but these s’mores were tres bien!